res parvae

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Submitted by traceturner

Submitted by traceturner


Submitted by accioali

Submitted by accioali


Anonymous asked: It’s “Virgil”, you ignorant bitch.

camelopardalis:

First of all, that last part was uncalled for. Secondly, and I say this in the nicest way possible, you are wrong.

The man referred to as Vergil or Virgil today had the name Publius Vergilius Maro. He is often called Virgil, yes, perhaps more frequently than he is called Vergil. However, according to his actual Roman name, ‘Vergil’ is the correct English.

His name was not spelled Virgilius until the Late Empire and Middle Ages. The reason for this is usually said to be that at that time, Vergil was believed to have magical or prophetic powers. The Latin word virga means twig or stick. By metonymy, it also means wand, staff, or magic wand (Livy, Ovid, and Vergil himself used the word in this context). The name Vergilius and the word virga were, in a fairly clever fashion, combined to emphasize his supposed powers. Or something.

‘Virgil’ is not an incorrect spelling, exactly. It’s just not true to his given Roman name. Both spellings are acceptable (though The Oxford Guide to Style suggests that you use Vergilius rather than Virgilius, and if you actually take Latin, well, you should know that any Oxford anything is the best — OED, OLD, OCD, &c.).

And finally, back to my first point, did you really just call me an “ignorant bitch” for preferring the spelling ‘Vergil’ over ‘Virgil’? I mean, well, okay then.